Disability

Disability means a physical or mental impairment, which has a substantial and long-term adverse effect on a person’s ability to carry out normal day-to-day activities.

Within the Equality Act 2010, disability means a physical or mental impairment, which has a substantial and long-term adverse effect on a person’s ability to carry out normal day-to-day activities.

Impairments can include sensory impairments, such as sight and hearing, or mental impairments such as learning disabilities, dyslexia and mental illness. A severe disfigurement counts as a disability. Cancer, HIV infection and multiple sclerosis are deemed disabilities as soon as they are diagnosed.

Although a minor impairment may not, on its own, count as substantial, a number of minor impairments taken together may be seen as having a substantial effect. If an impairment stops having a substantial effect, it can still be regarded as an impairment if there is a reasonable likelihood of the condition recurring, for example, epilepsy.

The employment rate for disabled people is only 47.5%

EHRC